4/11/15

The Remove From Play Team Mom Playbook - Affordable concussion-screening tool

is the ultimate tool for any team mom to use in assisting her to bring this affordable concussion-screening tool to her child’s school or team.

Remove From Play Testing features the King-Devick test, which is a timed, sideline concussion screening test that can be administered by parents and coaches in less than two minutes. The objective method uses rapid number naming to identify head trauma and determine whether an athlete should be removed from play. 

As a result, theKing-Devick test can help prevent the serious effects of repetitive concussions caused by premature return to play after a head injury. 

The accurate and reliable test can be applied to: football, soccer, lacrosse, hockey, cheerleading, rugby, baseball, martial arts, and all other contact and collision activities

Source: http://mobile.nytimes.com/blogs/well/2015/03/11/a-2-minute-test-to-detect-concussions/?_r=0&referrer 

An easy, two-minute vision test administered on the sidelines after a young athlete has hit his or her head can help to reliably determine whether the athlete has sustained a concussion, according to a new study of student athletes, some as young as 5. The test is so simple and inexpensive that any coach or parent potentially could administer it, the study’s authors believe, and any league afford to provide it as a way to help evaluate and safeguard players. Those of us who coach or care for young athletes know by now that an athlete who falls or collides with something during play or seems dazed, dizzy, loses consciousness or complains of head pain should be tested for a concussion, which occurs when the brain is physically jostled within the skull. But most of us are clueless about how to test young athletes. 

The most commonly recommended sideline test is the Standardized Assessment of Concussion, a multipart examination during which athletes are asked to name the date, describe how they feel, memorize and recall lists of words, and do jumping jacks and other tests of coordination


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